Major Mobile Stats from the Twitter S-1

As you're aware Twitter filed its public S-1 statement this afternoon. There's a great deal of interesting material in it. The company said that in 2010 revenue was roughly $28 million. Last year it was $317 million. This year it could well exceed $500 million, reflecting triple-digit ad revenue growth. 

The following are the important mobile-related stats disclosed in the S-1 filing (mostly verbatim statements):  

  • 75% of our average MAUs (monthly average users) accessed Twitter from a mobile device, including mobile phones and tablets
  • Over 65% of our advertising revenue was generated from mobile devices (through June, 2013). 
  • 218.3 million average MAUs . . . 49.2 million average MAUs in the United States and 169.1 million average MAUs in the rest of the world

In 2010 74% of Twitter's revenue came from data licensing and the remainder from ads. In 2012 85% of revenue came from ads and 15% from data licensing, reflecting a huge shift in the sources of revenue for the company.

Given that Twitter has a still relatively small number of users in the US and internationally there's plenty of room for growth -- domestically and abroad. 

Who Will 'Own' the Indoor Channel: Retailers or Google and Facebook?

One of the questions that we'll be addressing on the "Microfencing" (in-store/in-aisle targeting) panel at Place 2013 is "who will own the indoor channel?" The operating assumption is that the venue owners/retailers will control communications and marketing within their indoor environments. But that may not turn out to be true if retailers aren't careful and quick to embrace indoor location. 

An analogy may be the wireless carriers. Once the gatekeepers of all things mobile, they have largely been sidelined and reduced to "commodity" providers of bandwidth. The handset OEMs, platform providers and app developers dominate mobile. 

Earlier today Reuters reported that Cisco was "working with Facebook Inc to offer free Wi-Fi Internet access to consumers at public places such as hotels or retail stores using their Facebook log-in. A visitor could check in at a hotel without having to line-up at a front desk by simply signing in via the Facebook application on a smartphone, Cisco said."

Google is also contemplating its own WiFi infrastructure. By the same token some retailers are hesitant or cautious about embracing indoor location. For example, JC Penney decided to eliminate public WiFi to save $7 million a year. In doing so it shut down its indoor location consumer infrastructure. While it will save some money it won't stop showrooming and may deprive JC Penney of an important marketing and customer service capability. 

If companies such as Facebook and Google, or other third parties, step in and provide the consumer network, chances are very good that consumers will use the Facebook or Google network rather than the store's. That would likely make the Google and Facebook the new gatekeepers of indoor marketing, giving them a significant advantage over retailers and a stronger position when it comes to selling and delivering indoor advertising and promotions. 

Retailers cannot and should not "wait and see" or they may find themselves, like the wireless carriers, on the sidelines of digital marketing activity in their own stores. I could be wrong and there are a number of unknown variables. But retailers stand to lose much if they fail to act. 

We'll fully explore these questions at the Place Conference on Tuesday, October 8:

Microfencing: Targeting In-Aisle Shoppers

Billions of dollars are spent each year by brands and manufacturers trying to influence consumer buying in stores. A percentage of that money will migrate to indoor digital marketing. What conditions must first exist and what will those brand-consumer interactions look like? The panel will explore these questions as well as the contours of the broader indoor marketing experience. 

  • Neg Norton, President, Local Search Association
  • Ben Smith, CEO, Wanderful Media
  • Melissa Tait, VP of Technology, Primacy
  • Erik McMillan, CEO, BrickTrends
  • Asif Khan, Founder, Location Based Marketing Association (Moderator)

 

Is Amazon's Mayday a New Model for Mobile Customer Care (and Virtual Assistance)?

Arguably the most interesting thing about the new Kindle Fire "HDX" tablets is the so-called "Mayday" button. By pressing a single button HDX owners will see a live human appear in a pop-up window on their screens, as the picture to the right illustrates.

That individual can answer questions and perform diagnostic functions or fixes remotely. And while Amazon Kindle users can see the agent, the customer support person cannot see the Kindle owner (thereby preventing certain unseemly "chatroulette scenarios"). Amazon says most questions or issues are or can be resolved in relatively little time. Live support is free/included and available "24x7, 365 days a year." 

One review of the HDX questioned how scalable this service is. I suspect it's pretty scalable, especially if they offshore the support centers. But given that one can see the person on the other end of the line, offshoring may be less viable for something like this. In his post on the Opus Research Web site, my colleague Dan Miller sees the potential for a speech-enabled, automated personal virtual assistant to populate the agent screen.

My hunch is that Mayday will become a premium service or included with a Prime subscription ultimately. 

What's more interesting to consider is how Mayday might become a new model for customer service and/or sales support for tablet and mobile apps. Think about how much more e-commerce and conversions might happen if live support were available. In a mobile context "chat" doesn't really cut it. 

There are various in-between scenarios possible too, where a static image might be used instead of video together with a VoIP call. That would be the "low rent" version but it could be equally effective if executed properly. 

The success of Mayday and its emulation or replication by others would be a new spin on and give new meaning to the notion of the "personal virtual assistant." 

Report: Windows Phone Continues to Gain Share in Europe

Kantar Worldpanel ComTech has released new smartphone market share data showing significant gains for Windows Phone in Europe. The research firm says that Windows Phone is now within a point of the iPhone in Germany and that its growth is outpacing Android across the Continent: 

Android remains the top operating system across Europe with a 70.1% market share, but its dominant position is increasingly threatened as growth trails behind both Windows and iOS. Windows Phone has hit double digit sales share figures in France and Great Britain with 10.8% and 12% respectively – the first time it has recorded double digits in two major markets.

Kantar also says that Apple is continuing to show momentum in the US: "Apple continues to grow strongly year on year and now makes up 39.3% of sales." These data do not include the recent 9 million handsets sold by Apple upon the debut of the iPhone 5s and 5c.

Windows Phone's strongest markets are France, UK, Germany and Italy, where Nokia's brand is still relatively strong. It continues to lag in the US and China, however. 

  

Apple Now Top Global Brand, Followed by Google

Technology and internet companies have supplanted traditional brands at the top of Interbrand's annual "Top 100 Global Brands" list. Apple and Google are number 1 and 2 on the list respectively, beating out perennial winner Coke and others such as IBM, Disney, Microsoft and GE.

Notwitstanding its beating at the hands of investors and doubts about its future performance, Apple was picked by Interbrand as the world's "most valuable brand" for 2013. Google was last year's number 4. 

Facebook is number 52 on the list and Amazon comes in at number 19. Yahoo and BlackBerry dropped off the list entirely this year and Nokia "experienced the largest decline in brand value" in the 13 year history of the report. The top 15 on the list are below. 

Interbrand determines its annual ranking using a formula that combines:

  • The financial performance of the branded products or service
  • The role the brand plays in influencing consumer choice
  • The strength the brand has to command a premium price, or secure earnings for the company

Apple's rise to become the world's most valuable brand is striking. Interbrand says the Apple brand is currently worth $98 billion, which is considerable but much less than the company's overall market cap of $435 billion. According to Interbrand:

Apple has appeared on Interbrand’s Best Global Brands ranking since 2000, when the ranking debuted. In 2000, Apple ranked #36 and had a brand value of USD $6.6 billion. Today, Apple’s brand value is USD $98.3 billion– almost 15 times the amount of its brand value in 2000. Apple’s meteoric rise in brand value can be attributed to the way it has created a seamless omnichannel experience for customers. By keeping consumers at the center of everything it does, Apple is able to anticipate what they want next and break new ground in terms of both design and performance. With 72 million Macs in use and record-breaking sales of both the iPhone and iPad, Apple has made history by unseating Coca-Cola and becoming Interbrand’s most valuable global brand of 2013.

Amazon's New Devices, Aggressive Pricing Seek to Reclaim Tablet Spotlight

When Amazon introduced its original color tablet the Kindle Fire its chief innovations were aggressive pricing ($199) and the fact that the company used a "forked" version of Android that declared its independence from Google. There have since been two updates to the line (including yesterday's), which now includes four color tablets.

Yesterday Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduced refreshed Kindle hardware and software. There's a new "operating system," called Mojito (based on Android Jelly Bean). There are essentially two new tablets: Kindle Fire HDX (as in "beyond HD") in 7 and 8.9 inch versions. The Kindle Fire HD (7 inch) has been dropped to $139, which is sure to be the biggest seller, though it's effectively last year's model. There's also a clever new cover/stand called Origami

The big software innovation is "Mayday," which is live video tech support on the tablet screen. Here's how Amazon describes it: 

Kindle Fire HDX also introduces the revolutionary new "Mayday" button. With a single tap, an Amazon expert will appear on your Fire HDX and can co-pilot you through any feature by drawing on your screen, walking you through how to do something yourself, or doing it for you—whatever works best. Mayday is available 24x7, 365 days a year, and it's free.

As a practical matter Mayday is mostly a marketing gimmick, which probably won't see a great deal of actual use but will give some confidence to older and less tech-savvy buyers. What's more interesting to consider is the degree to which Mayday may be emulated by other industries (e.g., travel, shopping) for customer care purposes. That will be fascinating to watch. 

North American Non-iPad Traffic Share

Source: Chitika, September 2013 (North American Android tablet traffic share)

Currently in North America the iPad controls about 84% of tablet-based web traffic according to Chitika. The remaining 16% is mostly Android tablets and really a battle between Amazon, Samsung and Google (in order of market share). The $139 price point on the Kindle Fire HD will capture buyer attention and may put pressure on Samsung and Google. 

When Google introduced its new Nexus 7 earlier this year the company raised the price from $199 to $229 for the entry level model. The price increase was justified on the basis of new specs and a higher resolution screen. Amazon's Kindle Fire HD is almost $100 cheaper at $139. Without ads it's $154. The Nexus 7 is a superior device (to the Kindle Fire HD) but many people will not see a difference and opt for the much cheaper Kindle. 

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 is $199. Accordingly it will be very challenging for Google, Amazon or anyone to sell many smaller tablets at much above a low $200 price point. Whether the iPad Mini feels similar pricing or sales pressure is a question that remains to be answered. However I suspect iPad Mini sales will only be affected at the margins. 

Study: More than 75% of iPhones Sold Are the 5s

There was an initial surprise yesterday that Apple had sold 9 million iPhones over the weekend. Since the smoke cleared, however, there has been considerable "day two" analysis of those sales. Mobile analytics firm Localytics, for example, has done a geographic breakdown of global activations and traffic iPhone 5s and 5c devices in the past 72 hours. 

According to the company's analysis, the majority of overall new iPhone sales have been in the US, followed by Japan and the UK. 

iPhone 5s and 5c Global Market Share by Country

Though a still small market for the iPhone in absolute sales, China is significant in that the Chinese seem to be buying the 5s in much higher numbers than the 5c. This is something of a suprise considering that the price of the 5s in China exceeds $800. The now sold out gold version is selling on the grey market, according to several reports, for more than double that. 

iPhone 5s vs 5c by Country

In the US, roughly 3 out of every 4 iPhones sold is a 5s. Internationally, Localytics says that more than 80% of new iPhones sold are 5s devices.

 iPhone 5s vs 5c Distribution by Region

Our survey, conducted a week ago among 1,500 US adults, correctly predicted high demand for the 5s as well as the 5s to 5c ratios. 

What's interesting is that even in the face of massive weekend sales, the perceived weakness of the 5c is keeping Apple's stock down and fuelling the bearish Apple-investor narrative that the company has lost its old magic.

Perhaps surprising was that of the eight countries where the most iPhone 5s’ or 5c’s were sold, the highest ratio of preference for the 5s wasn’t in the United States or Japan; leading the pack is actually China.

iPhone 5s vs 5c by Country

One possible explanation: there was a lot of hoopla around the addition of the gold-colored iPhone 5s as a very attractive addition in particular for Asian markets so this hypothesis may hold true. Keep in mind the gold-colored version is only available on the 5s, not the 5c.

Other major markets also had a very high ratio of the 5s vs. the 5c. In fact, the only country that didn’t have at least a 3 to 1 ratio of the 5s vs. the 5c was the United Kingdom. With the economy in the UK still in recovery, a slightly less strong affinity for the 5s could be the result of a more cost-conscious buyer. Subsidies also play less of a role in the UK’s phone market than in the US, making the upfront cost of phones higher for consumers. Globally the iPhone 5s represented 78% of all of the new iPhone 5s and 5c devices; 76% in the U.S. and 82% in the rest of the world.

 iPhone 5s vs 5c Distribution by Region

 One possible reason why more iPhone 5s’ were sold was because of the tendency of hardcore apple users wanting to buy the top of the line iPhone on the weekend it was released. It will be interesting to see if the 5c can pick up a bit of momentum in the next few weeks.

iPhone 5s & 5c Adoption by Country

Overall, the United States accounts for 68% of all active iPhone 5s and 5c devices worldwide, with Japan in second place with 13% of 5s and 5c’s.

iPhone 5s and 5c Global Market Share by Country

- See more at: http://www.localytics.com/blog/2013/china-leads-the-pack-in-preference-for-iphone-5s-over-5c/#sthash.tVuxOsR6.dpuf

Most US Consumers Still ‘Not at All Interested’ in Mobile Wallets

picture

Precis

Several years ago many analysts projected that “mobile payments” and “mobile wallets” would become massive, multi-billion-dollar markets. With the exception of mobile e-commerce, it hasn’t happened.

The term “mobile payments” is used loosely to refer to a range of different types of activities. However imprecise use of the term creates confusion and widely varying assessments of the outlook for “mobile payments.” What we mean here by “mobile payments” is more specific: using a smartphone (and associated apps) as a credit card or wallet replacement in the real world.

That was the concept behind near-field communications (NFC) based Google Wallet. The assumption was that Google’s clout and visibility would propel both NFC and Google Wallet into the mainstream. However, two years later it’s safe to say that Google Wallet, at least as originally conceived, has failed. 

By contrast, so-called "m-commerce" and mobile payments through specific apps have shown increasing momentum. But the broad concept of a "horizontal" mobile wallet remains mostly undesirable to US consumers (at least in the abstract). 

A year ago Opus Research surveyed roughly 1,500 adults to determine their awareness and demand for mobile wallets. The question was: “How interested are you in using you mobile phone to pay for things and replace cash or your credit cards?” There were four potential responses. In order of waning enthusiasm they were:

  1. I’m extremely interested
  2. I’m fairly interested
  3. I have limited interest and
  4. I’m not at all interested

Featured Research is available to registered users only.

For more information on becoming an I2G client, please contact Pete Headrick (pheadrick@opusresearch.net).


First Weekend iPhone Sales Exceed 9 Million

Apple announced this morning that it had sold more than 9 million iPhone 5s and 5c devices this past weekend. It did not indicate how many of the 9 million were 5c devices vs. 5s devices. Most of the demand globally is likely to have been for the 5s. That's what our survey showed (see below).

The market became very nervous after the 5c went on sale for pre-orders a week ago and Apple didn't issue a press release last Monday. Many institutional investors sold Apple shares. Then the very postive 5s reviews came out stoking consumer demand.

Here's what Apple said in its release this morning: 

Apple today announced it has sold a record-breaking nine million new iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c models, just three days after the launch of the new iPhones on September 20. In addition, more than 200 million iOS devices are now running the completely redesigned iOS 7, making it the fastest software upgrade in history. 

Essentially the 5s sold out of its initial supply.

demand for 5s

Source: Opus Research, n=1,508 US adults (Sept 16 – 19 2013)

Last year Apple said it had sold 5 million iPhones during its first weekend. That was a record at the time. This nearly doubles it. The company also announced this morning that since iOS7 became available late last week, 200 million devices around the world have been upgraded.

I was concerned that I would dislike or be ambivalent about the new OS. However I actually like it quite a bit. 

The iPhone 5s sellout will only fuel further demand for the device. Supplies of the 5c remain available. But the public seems to recognize the 5c as "last year's model" with a new coat of paint. While that's not entirely true (there are some upgrades) demand for the 5c has been much less than the 5s as our survey last week predicted. 

Update: Localytics now answers the 5s vs. 5c sales question, saying that the 5s outsold the other device by a factor of more than 3X in the US and an even larger margin outside the US:

Carrier market share for iPhone 5s and 5c

5s vs 5c global

Report: PayPal Nears Deal for Rival Braintree

According to the Wall Street Journal, "PayPal is near a deal to buy Braintree Payments Solutions." Braintree has had great success as a payments platform and processor both for e-commerce and in mobile.

Braintree is behind payment processing for companies such as Uber, AirBnB, LivingSocial and OpenTable among others. The company has roughly 4,000 customers according to the WSJ piece. 

Braintree processes roughly $12 billion in payments annually, about $4 billion of which come from mobile commerce transactions. PayPal, by contrast said that it would process roughly $20 billion in mobile payments in 2013.

The deal would help further accelerate PayPal's mobile business. PayPal would also acquire Venmo, a P2P payments aoo, that Braintree bought in 2012 for just over $26 million. 

Among mobile wallet/payments companies PayPal is far and away the best-known brand, though US consumers still show relatively little interest in generic "mobile wallets," according to our survey data.

Google Wallet has largely failed to date and other "mobile wallets" and mobile payments providers are almost totally unknown to the public. This deal would help cement PayPal's leadership in mobile payments.

Recently PayPal introduced Beacon, a Bluetooth low energy (BLE) in-store payments and indoor-location solution that is helping, together with Apple, show NFC the door in North America.