Survey: 45% of Those Who Saw Ads in Apps Clicked

Mobile advertising platform Tapjoy released survey data about mobile user attitudes and behaviors surrounding engagement with in-app advertising. The online survey had 2,000 US adult respondents who owned smartphones and/or tablets and used apps. The major finding was that users respond best to ads in apps that offer rewards of some kind. 

Respondents were grouped in age and psychographic categories and profiled accordingly. The survey discovered that adults in the 25-34 age group "are more likely to value the influence of advertisements, they generally recall seeing more ads while using mobile apps." In addition during each app session people in this group recalled a larger number of ads vs. the total population.

These individuals had more paid apps on their devices than other age groups. In addition, once they saw an ad "50% choose to click on it, compared to only 45% of typical app users." These numbers are huge: half of those who noticed an ad clicked on it.

Here are some of the other top-level findings: 

  • App users are more likely to remember brands that offer unique rewards
  • 58% of users tried an app after downloading it to earn a reward
  • Respondents estimate that half of the apps they use are ad-¬≠supported; 64% of users reported having seen an advertisement within a mobile app.
  • 45% of these consumers reported clicking on one of the ads
  • 42% of users download an app because their friends and family suggested they do so
  • 24% of users will tell friends and family about [an app they like] and convince them to get it

Stepping back, none of this comes as a surprise. (There's also lots of discussion of virtual currency in the survey.) Mobile users tend to respond to ads more than PC users and in-app users perhaps more significantly than users of the mobile web. It also makes sense that ads containing some sort of incentive, deal/discount or call to action would see higher response than in the absence of those things.

We've written previously about how many -- indeed a majority -- of mobile ads suffer from bland or perfunctory ad creative and copy and are merely shrunk-down versions of PC campaigns rather than created specifically for mobile audiences. When mobile ads are well conceived they can be enormously effective.