AR Browser Maker Launches 'Paid Layer'

Netherlands-based Layar has launched an "app store" of its own -- a "paid layer" on Layar. The augmented reality (AR) browser says it has 1.6 million users. In a bid for more usage and a business model, the company has announced that it will offer users the ability to unlock paid apps or content that can then be viewed within the AR browser environment:

The Layar Payment Platform is setup to support multiple payment providers and multiple currencies, ready to serve the different local markets. Layar deals with legal, administrative and tax rules enabling the publisher to focus on their core activities: creating valuable experiences. The first payment provider is PayPal, supporting payments to residents of United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. More countries, currencies, payment methods and payment providers will be added regularly . . .

The first publishers to seize the opportunity include among others:

Berlitz City Guides: Berlitz helps people experience the city’s highlights: the best attractions, coziest restaurants, most comfortable hotels, coolest places to shop and most fashionable nightlife.
Mouse Reality for Disney World and Disneyland: Helps find and navigate all attractions, shows, shops, dinning, transportation, and more in Disneyland and Disney World.
EyeTour: Explore Puerto Rico’s natural beauty and rich cultural heritage through exclusive video content of historical sites, museums, restaurants, parks and more.
UK sold prices: ‘Sold House Price Data 2010′ – Check the latest UK residential Sold Price information as recorded by the Land Registry while on the move.

Here are a couple of screens from the Berlitz city guide app within an app:

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This makes great sense for the company and may help it offer something different vs. competitor Wikitude and eventual competitor Google (Goggles). The challenge here is to have high quality, unique and/or branded content that is not readily available otherwise. Otherwise, free content and local information on other apps will prevent this from really taking off.

AR will have a future as a quick way to get access to more information or content about a place, product, person or object (e.g., a painting or building in front of me) vs. keying in or speaking a query. But today it remains mostly a novelty and not a daily utility.