Study: 19% Said Retailers Without Mobile App 'Old Fashioned'

Apigee released new survey findings about mobile attitudes and usage in anticipation of Holiday 2012 shopping. The survey polled 2,200 US adults this month and was conducted by Harris.

It found that 57% of respondents "would consider" buying holiday gifts on their mobile devices. Currently the number of Americans who've made an "m-commerce" purchase stands at about 35%, according to 2012 survey data from IPSOS.

In order, Apigee survey found the following to be the most likely m-commerce categories:

  • Books – 32%
  • Electronics – 31%
  • Gift cards – 27%
  • DVDs/Blu-ray discs – 26%
  • Clothing – 24%
  • Toys – 20% 

The survey didn't ask about specific retailers but all of the above categories (maybe clothing excepted) are popular on Amazon, which continues to be the single biggest beneficiary of mobile commerce (perhaps after Apple iTunes).  

Apigee also asked consumers about the perceived benefits of using mobile (apps):

  • Browsing for deals wherever you are – 50%
  • Performing price comparisons inside a store – 48%
  • Using a mobile device to find a retail store – 40%
  • Redeeming electronic coupons – 38%
  • Secretly shopping without a spouse/significant other knowing – 25%
  • Buying embarrassing or personal items without using a work computer – 14%
  • Sneaking shopping time in at work – 12%

Just over half of the survey respondents had a negative reaction to the idea that a retailer wouldn't have a mobile presence or offer a mobile app. Most damning, 19% said "it makes me think the retailer is old-fashioned" and 7% said it might hurt their loyalty to the store. Younger users were mostly likely to have a negative attitude toward retailers without mobile apps.

Clearly e-commerce isn't the only reason to offer a mobile site or mobile app. There are many other reasons, including getting shoppers into stores, CRM and providing better customer service in the store (or overall). 

I wrote earlier this week about a GroupM survey that offers some very interesting insights about mobile showrooming and in-store shopping. That study suggested ways that retailers can integrate mobile into a larger strategy to lure and keep shoppers in stores and combat the showrooming challenge.